WHEN DO WE STOP LOOKING AWAY AS A SOCIETY?

Yesterday a story broke of two wonderful “Unspoken Heroes” in Louisiana that decided to take action to save a little girls life, correct? I call them unspoken heroes as we all fight these scourges everyday.

These men, who, are fathers saw a vehicle, and stopped and took immediate action to save a little girl who an amber alert had been issued for in the state of Louisiana.

This was a wonderful thing for this little girl’s family to hear. She is safe, for now. But we, as a society, will never hear of the damages that happened to her that night she was taken until she was saved. This is the long term damage that we as a society do not speak of here in America.

https://sharedhope.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/SH_Responding-to-Sex-Trafficking-Victim-Offender-Intersectionality2020_FINAL.pdf

In today’s Society we don’t want to talk about what might happen if you are trafficked and you are around that age of consent and our dear ol’ criminal justice system fails us. It’s not any one Prosecuting Attorney’s fault, you see, in the decisions the are Bound To Hold unto them according to the law…yet when they take the personal decision to NOT prosecute a case on a determination that a case would be ‘not so beneficial to them’ then that is a personal decision that stays with them for their entire career.

https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billNavClient.xhtml?bill_id=202120220AB124#:~:text=AB%20124%2C%20as%20introduced%2C%20Kamlager,serves%20the%20interests%20of%20justice.

In California, there is bill on the floor that is going to revolutionize state and hopefully be picked up by other states in the future.

This bill would, until January 1, 2022, require the court, when selecting the term that best serves the interests of justice, to consider if the inmate (a.k.a. survivor/escapee) experienced intimate partner violence, commercial sex trafficking, commercial sexual exploitation, or human trafficking, and if the trauma of those experiences was a contributing factor to the defendant’s criminal behavior that would make a sentence other than the lowest possible sentence unduly harsh. The bill would, after January 1, 2022, require the court to consider those factors in mitigation of the crime.

This is revolutionary when you look at the scope of how Civil Rights reformation is taking place right now. Here in Missouri and in the Midwest we have states that still believe Human Trafficking, Intimate Partner Violence, Commercial Sex Trafficking (CSM) and other traumas like these either simply don’t occur here or that the victim should be held culpable for the crime because “drugs and criminal activity are the cause of the problem”.

According to the GLOBAL REPORT ON TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS 2020:

https://www.unodc.org/documents/data-and-analysis/tip/2021/GLOTiP_2020_15jan_web.pdf

  • Countries in North America detect more adult women than any other victim profile
  • The majority of detected victims in North America, Central America and the Caribbean are trafficked for the purpose of sexual exploitation.
  • North American countries are characterized by an increasing share of victims trafficked within their own countries; mainly female victims trafficked for sexual exploitation.
  • Countries in Central America and the Caribbean detect own nationals and victims from some countries in South America. At the same time, victims from these countries are detected in the richer countries of North and South America.
  • In North America, Central America and the Caribbean, sexual exploitation is the most commonly detected form of trafficking (over 70 per cent), which is among the highest recorded globally. The share of detected victims trafficked for forced labour ranges between 13 and 22 percent in the two sub regions.
  • In North America, victims are also trafficked for mixed forms of exploitation (sexual and forced labour), as well as for exploitative begging, forced criminal activity and forced marriage.
  • As far as victims of trafficking for sexual exploitation are concerned, most victims in North America are adult women, while a higher share of girls is reported in Central America and the Caribbean. In North America, detected victims who are trafficked for forced labour are mainly adults, with men and women detected in similar shares. The victims detected in Central America and the Caribbean who are exploited in forced labour are girls and boys.
  • In North America, Mexico and Canada reported information on the sex of persons going through criminal justice system procedures for trafficking in persons, all of them were mostly males.

If we as a Society here in North America are to start to understand not only the Global Implications of Human Trafficking in a whole and how this effects the ‘scope of practice’ in not only our criminal justice system, but those around the world….then we must move on past awareness and move towards implementation of these practices in our lives and standing up for our survivors and escapes.

— { Tiffany Marler Vice Chair, Board of Directors; Nomoretears21:4 © 2021 All Rights Reserved

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We are an Anti-HT, LT, & sexual exploitation advocacy NP Corp. Domestic organization [N000714003]

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Nomoretears21:4 Non-Profit

Nomoretears21:4 Non-Profit

We are an Anti-HT, LT, & sexual exploitation advocacy NP Corp. Domestic organization [N000714003]

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